Breaking the Chains: The Art of Staying Positive

By Erin Elizabeth Austin

Judgmental. Harsh. Critical. As Christians, we are taught that we shouldn’t be negative in our outlook on life. We’re supposed to be happy, positive people who always see the glass as half-full, but that’s easier said than done. Personally, it’s something I only manage to accomplish when I regularly ask God for help.

Whether or not we like to admit it, I think most of us have the tendency to be a little cynical in the way we view what’s happening in the world around us. Because there is so much evil in the world, we’re taught that we shouldn’t trust others. As children, we learn not to talk to strangers. As adults, we’re reminded not to pick up hitchhikers on the street. We’re even taught as we grow up to stay away from people who dress a certain way because as a general rule that means they’re bad. And while it’s good to exercise caution in this day and age, I can’t help but wonder if we’ve become too critical and narrow-minded.

 

 

Critical spirit, criticism, bondage, freedom, judging others, Breaking the Chains: The Art of Staying Positive, Erin Elizabeth Austin, Katy Kauffman, Broken but Priceless Ministries

Broken but Priceless: The Magazine

Grab a cup of hot chocolate, and snuggle in your favorite chair. Here’s a magazine you’ll want to read. Broken but Priceless: The Magazine is an encouraging resource for those who have chronic illnesses and for those who need some hope in the middle of trials. The magazine is free and comes by email to subscribers. Since I have the privilege of designing it, I get to read all the articles before they’re released and I anticipate with excitement the time when everyone else reads them. 

 

 

Broken but Priceless Ministries, Broken but Priceless: the Magazine, chronic illness, adversity, difficulties, hope, Erin Elizabeth Austin, Josie Siler, Katy Kauffman, Lighthouse Bible Studies

Broken but Priceless in God’s Eyes: An Interview with Erin Elizabeth Austin

Last week, Erin Austin guest-blogged for me about waiting on God. This week, I want you to hear her story. In this interview, you will see her heart for people, the amazing ministry she has, and the storm in her life that propelled her in a new direction. When you receive surprising news or go through a storm beyond your control, there is always hope, and God is able to do amazing things. He has done amazing things in and through Erin. Her brave spirit and powerful words inspire me, and as you read, I believe they will inspire you too.

 

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself. What makes you uniquely you? (Are you a secret rock star? A glorious painter? A super nanny?)

I’ll be the first to admit I’m a unique person, but trust me when I say you don’t want to see me paint! I can’t even draw a good stick person. Having said that, I’m actually quite good at crafts, decorating, and making things beautiful, including the things that most people consider to be trash. It’s one of my specialties, well, that and entertaining children. I started working with children when I was a teenager. I’ve done everything from working as a camp counselor to being a house parent in a children’s home. I suppose that’s why my nephews are my three favorite people. There’s nothing quite like spending time with a child and helping him realize how special he is.  

 

 

Erin Elizabeth Austin, Broken but Priceless Ministries, Katy Kauffman, Why does God let bad things happen

Limbo!

By Erin Elizabeth Austin

I have the privilege today of posting a guest blog by a good writer friend, Erin Elizabeth Austin. We met at the Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writers Conference two years ago, and since then, I have been greatly encouraged by her brave spirit and beautiful words. The topic for today’s post is timely for me, and I hope it encourages you too!

Did you ever play the game Limbo when you were a kid? You know the one I’m talking about the game where two people stand holding the opposite ends of a yardstick or broom while a line of people see if they can go underneath the stick without bending forward or touching the stick. The point of the game is to see how flexible people are, something that’s fun when you’re a child, but not so much when you’re an adult.

I’ve always been very flexible, which made Limbo one of the few games I won in gym class. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same thing for life.  ...

 

 

waiting on God, seasons of life, Erin Elizabeth Austin, life with God, Lighthouse Bible Studies